A publication of the Carleton University School of Journalism and Communication

Residential mural approved: Council responds to persistent tagging

By on Nov 25, 2014

  The seventh time Laurie Kingston’s fence was tagged with spray paint this summer, her family got fed up. “It was a collective groan about the work we were going to have to do,” said Kingston, of her family’s reaction. “It’s exhausting.” Kingston received a notice from the City each time her fence was tagged, and spent hours repainting to avoid being fined. Often the spray paint needed to be scraped off; sometimes the fence required two new coats of paint. Kingston turned to Capital Ward councillor David Chernushenko for help. He submitted a proposal to the City’s planning committee, asking it to waive the bylaw that prohibits murals on residential properties. The planning committee, including Chernushenko, unanimously approved the mural at a meeting on Tuesday. This mural will be the first of its kind on a residential property...

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Ontario’s new anti-smoking legislation targets youth

By on Nov 25, 2014

It may taste like candy, but watermelon-flavoured tobacco can still kill. The Ontario government emphasized this message on Monday after announcing new anti-smoking legislation which aims to curb nicotine habits among young people. The proposed legislation, coming into effect on Jan. 1 2015, will eliminate the sale of cigarette products on college and university campuses. It will also ban the use of flavoured tobacco products and restrict the sale of electronic cigarette devices to those over the age of 18. “This packaging wasn’t designed to appeal to adults. It’s designed to appeal to youth,” Ontario Associate Health Minister Dipika Damerla said at a news conference Monday, holding up a neon green package of watermelon-flavoured tobacco. “With hundreds and hundreds of flavours to choose from – from strawberry, to watermelon, to bubblegum – flavoured tobacco has become a gateway to...

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Ontario Council of Universities asks for exemption from provincial watchdog

By on Nov 25, 2014

Ontario’s universities say they don’t want the provincial Ombudsman looking over their shoulder as they handle complaints, including sexual assaults. A government bill currently before the provincial parliament would allow students who believe their university has mishandled a complaint to appeal to a provincial Ombudsman. Bill-8 aims to add an extra layer of oversight to the university sector, but testifying to a committee considering the bill last night, the Ontario Council of Universities argued it’s not necessary. “Statistics in the most recent annual report by the Ontario Ombudsman show that the number of university-related complaints that the Ombudsman receives is very small, and not sufficient to warrant increased oversight into the university sector,” said the Ontario Council of Universities’ submission. The low number of complaints from university students may not be surprising, given that the office currently has no...

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Slow progress for women on corporate boards in Canada

By on Nov 25, 2014

If the federal government wants to crack the glass ceiling in corporate boardrooms, it has a long way to go. In a report last week, the Canadian Board Diversity Council said just 17 per cent of board members are women. The federal government has a goal of 30 per cent. Dr. Kellie Leitch, Minister of Labour and Minister responsible for the Status of Women, released the plan Good for Business last June that hopes to have this 30 per cent by 2019. There is no time like the present: according to the report, women earn the majority of Canadian university degrees and in 2011, 34.5 per cent of all Masters of Business Administration (MBAs) graduates were women. Female enrollment in undergraduate business and commerce programs averaged 42.8 per cent in fall 2012. Female Enrolment in Business & Commerce Programs:...

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Ottawa hack attack not yet over

By on Nov 25, 2014

If you need information from the Ottawa police website, you will have to wait. As of Tuesday afternoon, the Ottawa police website was still unavailable following an attack on Sunday by a hacker working under the pseudonym Aerith. Web users trying to access the police website could see only an error message saying that it was unavailable. While certain services, such as reporting crimes, are still available by phone, users do not currently have the convenience of online access. This attack, and others on the City of Ottawa and the City of Laval websites, were launched in response to the arrest of a Barrhaven teen on May 8. The teen is facing charges based on multiple incidents of “SWATing” : a practice in which someone calls in a fake crime, prompting a police response. Such responses can include SWAT...

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Pricey housing tough for young buyers

By on Nov 25, 2014

Young homebuyers are stretched to the max when entering the market for the first time, say real estate experts. “The biggest problem now is the house prices have escalated so high, and that’s based on the fact that the mortgage rates are so low,” said Kevin Lowe, a real estate investor and owner of Lowe Properties Ltd. “Instead of borrowing $100,000 they have to borrow $300,000 today,” he said. Young people are under pressure to buy a house before prices become too high, and while interest rates are still low. The Canadian Real Estate Association released a study in October that shows the average price of a Canadian home has risen 7.1 per cent in the last 12 months. When mortgage rates are low, people choose to take on more debt. When the monthly payments are not very expensive,...

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