A publication of the Carleton University School of Journalism and Communication

Michael Qaqish brings young blood to city council

By on Dec 2, 2014

​ Michael Qaqish celebrated his 29th birthday by signing his declaration of office as new councillor of Gloucester-South Nepean. Dressed in official robes that made them look like a choir, Mayor Jim Watson and council sang Happy Birthday to Qaqish as they posed for their first official photo.Qaqish is the youngest of the 23 Ottawa city councillors who were sworn in Monday night at Centrepointe Theatre. During his 10-month campaign, Qaqish encouraged young people to volunteer. Tuesday, Qaqish will begin work at City Hall and hopes, over the next four years, to set an example that will attract more young people to politics. Qaqish, whose interest in politics started on campus at Carleton University, is already encouraging young people to participate in politics. He said most of his campaign volunteers were university political science students. “It was good to...

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Dismal public service prospects for young graduates

By on Dec 2, 2014

A troubling trend has emerged for university graduates hoping to work in the federal public service, leading them to look elsewhere for jobs. Only 112 graduates were hired through the federal government’s Post-Secondary Recruitment program in 2013-2014—an all-time low—according to the Public Service Commission’s annual report released in late October. The report shows an enormous drop in hiring through the program since 2009 when nearly 1,700 recent graduates were hired. While there are other ways to be hired into the federal public service, the recruitment program is the largest point of entry for graduates. Last year 13,149 recent graduates applied to the program. Of those applicants, 2,100 were selected as qualified candidates for public service jobs and added to what the Public Service Commission calls targeted career stream inventories. But less than one per cent of those qualified candidates—112...

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Rogers joins sexual assault conversation with Project 97 campaign

By on Dec 2, 2014

Rogers has launched a social media campaign designed to keep the conversation about sexual violence in Canada going for the next year. Project 97, launched on Monday, encourages an open and active dialogue for one year. The name of the project is a reference to the fact that 97 per cent of sexual violence cases are never reported as crimes. According to Topsy analytics, traffic around the hashtag #Project97 spiked on Twitter Tuesday, garnering both praise and questions from Canadians. @Rogers launches #Project97, a year-long conversation abt sexual assault involving six media outlets. http://t.co/icTRKNDoDd This is amazing — Andrew Livingstone (@AndrwLvngstn) December 2, 2014 Rogers will use seven of its publications — Maclean’s, Chatelaine, Today’s Parent, Flare, Canadian Business, City News and L’actualité— as platforms for discussion outside of social media. Rena Bivens, a post-doctoral fellow at Carleton University,...

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Student food bank use on the rise

By on Dec 2, 2014

For some university students, limited cash for groceries is often associated with heavy partying and a lack of proper budgeting. But a new report from the Ontario Association of Food Banks has found the increasing cost of post-secondary education may be making it harder for students to feed themselves. “Students make up close to five per cent of all food bank users,” said Amanda King, manager of membership and communication for the Ontario Association of Food Banks. “I know it sounds small, but it’s not. Five per cent of 375,000 people every single month is a big number—especially when you look at it year after year.” Post-secondary students are one of the fastest growing groups of food bank users in Ontario, according to the report. Rising tuition, rent and food prices, coupled with a lack of income, are the...

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Fall breaks here to stay on more Ontario university campuses

By on Dec 2, 2014

A growing number of Ontario universities are now giving their students a mid-term break in the fall as well as the winter. Carleton University is the latest to approve a permanent fall reading week. On Nov. 28 the Carleton University Senate passed a motion to instate a fall break, after experimenting with one for the last two years. “The students on campus highlighted that it’s something that they want and the student representatives took that on board and fought for it,” said Folarin Odunayo, president of the Carleton University Students’ Association. For decades, universities have had reading weeks during their winter semesters, just as elementary and high schools have had winter breaks, usually in March. A fall break is a new concept, in comparison, but it is quickly becoming the norm. Across Ontario, 11 out of 20 universities, including...

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Condom campaign rolls out, wins award

By on Dec 2, 2014

  Apublic health campaign that distributed free condoms around Toronto has won the Public Health Social Media Challenge. The campaign titled condomTO has drawn the attention of young people on social media. On Tuesday, Rathika Sitsabaiesan, MP for Scarborough-Rouge River, accepted a $30,000 cheque on behalf of Toronto Public Health at the award ceremony held in a hotel in Ottawa. “One of the goals of the condomTO campaign was to combat condom fatigue and the stigma around condom use,” said David McKeown, medical officer of health at the City of Toronto. “We succeeded on social media by building a healthy conversation around condom use and engaging with our audience,” said McKeown. Condom fatigue is the reluctance by some people to use protection during sex. “Many of the retweets, favourites and likes we saw on social media came from younger...

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