A publication of the Carleton University School of Journalism and Communication

Slow going for Ottawa University anti-racism centre

By on Nov 18, 2014

A proposed resource centre to address racism at the University of Ottawa failed to gain support at a key student vote Monday night. Not enough students showed up to the student federation’s first ever general assembly to vote in favour of holding a referendum to decide on the creation of a “racialized student” centre at the university. The proposed centre would cost each full-time student just one dollar per year. Student federation (SFUO) president Anne-Marie Roy said the organization has been receiving more complaints of racial discrimination at the university, including complaints against university faculty members. Roy expressed frustration at the “barriers that racialized students face on campus every day.” According to Ottawa University law student Chelsi Bonair, a “racialized” person is somebody who believes they have been on the receiving end of racial discrimination. The term is often used...

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Mentorship for young female entrepreneurs, tool for success

By on Nov 18, 2014

Young women face numerous challenges in the workplace but their chances of success could be significantly improved through mentorship programs, the House of Commons Standing Committee for the Status of Women heard Tuesday morning. “When you support a woman to succeed, you can change a community,” said Hodan Nalayeh, executive producer of Integration TV, a television program for the Somali community in Canada. The House of Commons committee heard from five witnesses as part of its investigation into how to increase economic prosperity among Canadian women. The average income for women in 2008 was $30,100, while men earned $47,000 on average, according to Statistics Canada. At the committee meeting, discussion frequently circled back to the struggles that many young female entrepreneurs face. Witnesses said that education and mentorship programs are important in guiding youth into the workplace. “I was...

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Budget surpluses to go to families and businesses, but not youth

By on Nov 18, 2014

Students didn’t know what they were missing when Federal Finance Minister Joe Oliver announced that the budget surplus would be smaller than originally projected last week. Alexandria Cushing, a third-year engineering student at Carleton, didn’t even know that there is a budget surplus. “No I wasn’t aware of that,” Cushing said. Last Wednesday, Oliver said the surplus is going to be $1.9 billion in the current fiscal year – much less than the $6.4 billion predicted by the Harper government in 2013. It is lower because of the government’s recent tax cuts for some families and small business owners. Where did the surplus money go? | Create Infographics The government’s new income-splitting plan will allow married couples with children to take up to $50,000 of one spouse’s income and assign it to the other spouse in order to move...

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Twitter campaign gets response from Canadian government

By on Nov 18, 2014

Political activists looking for attention from their government may want to create a hashtag. It was #KeepJulienBlancOutOfCanada, after all, that put Julien Blanc—the pick-up artist notorious for promoting sexual assault via Twitter—on the radar of Canadian Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Chris Alexander. Canada’s involvement is the latest development in the #TakeDownJulienBlanc campaign, which got Blanc’s Australian visa cancelled. “I became aware of this individual, and the campaign to ban him from coming to Canada,” said Alexander in a statement released to yPolitics Monday. “I have since seen disturbing video and web content that are completely counter to Canadian values and common decency.” 1/ I see your tweets & am aware of #KeepJulienBlancOutofCanada. His content is completely counter to Canadian values and common decency. — Chris Alexander (@MinChrisA) November 10, 2014 2/ My job is to ensure our imm...

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Whitby-Oshawa byelection: Liberal support rises despite low turnout

By on Nov 18, 2014

The Conservative candidate Pat Perkins has been chosen to replace the late finance minister Jim Flaherty in a Monday byelection where voter turnout was much lower than the previous election. Just less than 32 per cent of eligible voters in Whitby-Oshawa voted yesterday, an enormous drop from the 2011 general election when 63 per cent voted. Perkins received 49.2 per cent of the vote. Liberal candidate Celina Caesar-Chavannes took 40.7 per cent of the vote and NDP candidate Trish McAuliffe came in a distant third with 8.1 per cent. Perkins has been the mayor of Whitby since 2006 and was endorsed by the Christine Elliott, MPP for Whitby-Oshawa and wife of the late finance minister. Flaherty was the Whitby-Oshawa MP for eight years before he passed away in April. “The residents have now spoken and the Whitby-Oshawa riding will now...

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“Conservative shift” seen after 9/11 could be happening in Canada now

By on Nov 18, 2014

The murders of two Canadian soldiers and the attack at Parliament Hill in Ottawa may be causing a “conservative shift” in Canada according to Paul Nail, a psychology professor at the University of Central Arkansas. Nail co-authored a study with Ian McGregor of York University published in 2009 that compared political attitudes in the U.S. before and after the Sept. 11 attacks. The study found that there was an observed increase in conservative attitudes following the terrorist attacks in New York City. Now, he says, the same thing may be happening in Canada. The Liberals have dominated the political polls for a good portion of the past two years, but according to a recent poll by Nanos Research, Stephen Harper may be closing in on Justin Trudeau in the race for prime minister. The poll, published on Nov 12,...

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